Today I Learned...

Key Takeaways:
  • The most common version of the scam involves a call from someone posing as the grandchild of the victim
  • What makes this type of scam so effective is that it plays on the emotions of victims
  • If the caller won't answer questions about their parents or other family members, then chances are good that this is a scammer
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any grandparents have been victims of this scam, which is also sometimes called the "grandparent scam."

The most common version of the scam involves a call from someone posing as the grandchild of the victim. The caller says that he or she is in trouble and needs money. Sometimes the caller will claim that he or she is in prison, but other times they will say they were arrested on vacation or during a sporting event. The caller asks not to tell his or her parents because it will embarrass them. He or she then asks for money wired to him or her — often to places like Mexico or Canada.

What makes this type of scam so effective is that it plays on the emotions of victims, who want to help their grandchildren — but it's important for people to know how these scammers operate so they can protect themselves from being victimized by one!

The most common version of the scam involves a call from someone posing as the grandchild of the victim.

The most common version of the scam involves a call from someone posing as the grandchild of the victim, who claims to be in trouble while traveling in another country and needs money wired immediately. The scammer will often have an accent that matches or is similar to that of your family member’s, but is not always so; it’s important to remember that scammers can easily fake an accent.

This type of call seems suspicious because it doesn't fit with your idea of what could possibly happen on vacation—but if you're getting a call from someone claiming to be related to you, and they sound like they're in distress, it's easy for even seasoned travelers like yourself to panic into making a fast decision without thinking things through carefully first.

The caller says that he or she is in trouble and needs money.

A grandparent scam is a type of phone scam in which the caller says that he or she is in trouble and needs money. Scammers will typically claim to be the victim's relative, usually a grandchild, and say that they are in some kind of trouble—jail, for example.

They ask for money to be wired immediately so that they can get out before their parents find out what happened (or whatever). The caller will try to use emotion or embarrassment as leverage: "I don't want my parents to know I got arrested!"

Sometimes, the scammer will claim to be in prison. Other times, they'll say they were arrested during a sporting event or on vacation. The purpose is to make you feel sorry for them by telling you how much they miss their family and would like to see them again.

The scammer may also try to get your sympathy by giving details about why they are in jail—for example, that it was because of drunk driving or an unpaid traffic ticket. But remember: if this person really was arrested for some crime like that, he or she would be put into the country's system of justice and not calling you from prison!

The caller asks not to tell his or her parents because it will embarrass them.

The scammer will try to keep you from telling your family about the situation. They may say that it would embarrass his or her parents and other family members if you told them about the scam. As a result, they might ask you not to tell anyone else in your family.

You should be aware that this is often a tactic used by scammers who are trying to isolate their victims from loved ones as much as possible. By keeping them isolated, they're also limiting their victims' ability to call other family members for help or advice regarding the situation at hand (since those family members do not know what's happening).

The caller wants money wired to him or her — often to places like Mexico or Canada.

The grandparent scam generally works like this: the caller will claim to be a grandchild in distress and ask that money be wired to him or her — often to places like Mexico or Canada. The caller will give you a name of a bank, but it is often fake. He or she may also give you an account number and address for where to send the money.

What makes this type of scam so effective is that it plays on the emotions of victims, who want to help their grandchildren.

What makes this type of scam so effective is that it plays on the emotions of victims, who want to help their grandchildren. Grandparents are more likely than other adults to be emotionally involved in and concerned about their grandchildren, and they will often do something they wouldn't normally do if asked by a grandchild.

They may also be willing to take risks for them. Grandparents often assume that they know what's best for their grandchildren, so they're not likely to question a request from their grandchild.

Be skeptical when you get a call from someone claiming to be your grandchild and asking for money.

When you get a call from someone claiming to be your grandchild and asking for money, it might seem like the right thing to do.

But before you send any money, take a few minutes to pause and think about what is happening. If the caller asks:

  • How much money can I have?
  • Where are you holding my passport?
  • Can I speak with another family member or friend?

If you get a call from someone claiming to be your grandchild, ask them questions to determine whether or not they really are who they say they are. If the caller won't answer questions about their parents or other family members, then chances are good that this is a scammer. Also, remember that your real grandchildren will never ask for money over the phone!

Learn more tips to help you avoid scams:

Posted 
Nov 13, 2022
 in 
Money
 category
How To Recognize Email Scams
Technology
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