Today I Learned...

Key Takeaways:
W

orking a gig job can be a great way to make money and have flexibility in your life.

Many people find that working for themselves gives them the freedom to choose when and where they work, which means no commute and more time with family or friends. However, there are some downsides to working a gig job as well. Let's take a look at both sides of this coin.

Pros of working a gig job

1. Flexible schedule

Working a gig job allows you to set your own hours and work around other commitments. You can even work from home, if that's what you prefer! Overall, you have the flexibility to work when it's convenient for you.

2. Freedom

You're in control of how much time and energy goes into each project, so this means that if there's something more interesting on the horizon, then it's possible for you to switch projects without any sort of penalty being imposed upon yourself.

You also don't need to commit yourself to a long-term contract or agreement for a gig. This means that if things change, like if a company closes down or decides to hire someone else, then chances are good that you'll be able to move on with little disruption in your life.

Additionally, since people do not typically have specific tasks assigned by companies (or at least not as many as regular jobs), this gives them more freedom when deciding what work they want to be done instead of just following orders from higher up officials like managers or directors who would otherwise tell them exactly where they should start working next week.

3. No schedule required

You can work when you want, you can work when you have time, and you can even take a break if something else comes up. You are not bound by the policies of a standard workplace; there is no schedule required. This is great if this job fits into your lifestyle or if it gives you more freedom with your schedule.

4. Building skills

The skills you learn while working a gig job may be transferable to other careers, or they may be useful in the future when working on your own projects.

5. You choose what you do

You can choose what you want to do, and there are many different types of jobs that fit this category. You could focus on one aspect of the job or type of job and become very good at it. For example, you might specialize in IT troubleshooting or programming a specific software. Or you may decide that you'd like to try something new every day and work on lots of different projects with a variety of companies.

Whatever your preference, there are plenty of gig jobs out there for anyone who wants them!

Cons of working a gig job

1. Stability

The pay is often inconsistent, and there is no guarantee of work. You might get hired for one job and then not be able to get another gig for months.

2. Lack of benefits

Many gig jobs do not offer benefits like health insurance or paid time off. So you will likely have to pay for those yourself.

3. Payment

You may not get paid regularly. Some gigs don't pay until after they are complete, which can be frustrating if you need the money right away.

There is no guarantee that you will always get paid the amount that you expect. Some gigs pay on commission, so it's possible that you could earn less than expected if the people who hired you don't like what they see or buy your services.

Working a gig job is a great way to make money and gain experience in your field of choice.

However, it can also be stressful and require a lot of time management.

But there are many benefits to working a gig job, including flexibility and being able to work from home. If you're looking for something with less commitment than a full-time job but still offers some degree of security, then maybe this type of employment might be right up your alley!

Posted 
Aug 29, 2022
 in 
Work
 category