The Hartford has found in its research that a large majority of active agers are in favor of RV travel. Of the 2,000 respondents surveyed, 75% said they felt positive towards RVing, and 50% agreed that it was a good way to travel. However, only 10% of active agers own their own recreational vehicle. The Hartford's research also suggests that two things are motivating active agers to take up RV traveling: staying healthy and spending time with loved ones. This is great news for the recreational vehicle industry because as people grow older they tend to travel more often and stay away from home longer‚ÄĒmaking them ideal customers for motorhomes and trailers!

Active Agers are likable towards RV travel but fewer own their own RV than one might expect.

The survey results reveal that RV owners are more open-minded and positive towards RVs than non-RV owners. For example, 50% of RV owners said they would be interested in taking a road trip to see the country compared to only 37% of non-RV owners (the difference is statistically significant). Only 10% of RV owners said they wouldn't go on a road trip at all, compared with 27% of non-RV owners. This finding aligns with other research suggesting that people who own RVs tend to be happier than those who don't. It's possible that their higher satisfaction level is due in part to their willingness to take long trips.

One interesting finding from The Hartford's research is that bigger is not necessarily better when it comes to recreational vehicles.

One interesting finding from The Hartford's research is that bigger is not necessarily better when it comes to recreational vehicles. The average size of the RVs owned by today's active agers is less than half the size of those owned by their parents' generation, with a lower percentage choosing larger models (Figure 1). This trend may be due to many factors including increased fuel efficiency, higher costs and tighter parking restrictions in urban areas. In general, consumers are gravitating toward lighter weight vehicles that are easier to maneuver and drive.

One reason to explain why few active agers own their own RV could be that they won't stick around long enough to pay off the purchase cost.

One reason to explain why few active agers own their own RV could be that they won't stick around long enough to pay off the purchase cost. RVs are not an investment, they are a liability. The cost of purchasing and maintaining an RV can be very expensive, making it hard to recoup your investment through reselling the vehicle when you decide to stop traveling.

Furthermore, many people do not fully understand how much work is involved in maintaining an RV. Repairing leaks and cleaning up after dirt that has accumulated on the roof can be time consuming tasks that leave you with less time for fun activities while on vacation!

Conclusion

As more and more people turn to RV travel as their preferred way to explore the country, it's important we understand who these prospective customers are. What do they expect from a recreational vehicle? And how can manufacturers of these vehicles cater to these customer needs? These are questions The Hartford asked in their 2016 study of active agers and RV travel.

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Posted 
Jun 9, 2022
 in 
Lifestyle
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