Key Takeaways:

Aging has changed over the decades. It is continuing to change and will continue to evolve. The Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging focuses on research, convening, advocacy, and partnerships that help to promote healthy longevity and financial wellness.

Aging has changed over the decades. It is continuing to change and will continue to evolve. The Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging focuses on research, convening, advocacy, and partnerships that help to promote healthy longevity and financial wellness. All of their work aims to improve lives and build a better future for all ages.

Lauren Dunning, Director at the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging, and Associate Director, Caroline Servat, are coming to GetSetUp on Thursday, October 28 to share their insights. They will discuss a reimagined future based on multidisciplinary research about critical issues in aging, such as aging in community, intergenerational connection, and connected health.

Lauren, a public health lawyer, worked extensively in public health policy prior to joining Milken. She is dedicated to helping advance healthy and purposeful aging.

“With shifting demographics across the globe—the number of adults over 60 is set to double by mid-century—we must take a new look at the opportunities presented by our changing society, as well as address the realities of our aging population. Promising ideas, new models, and compelling research findings emerge daily, and through them there is great potential to address the challenges we see in our own communities, from health inequities to ageism to financial insecurity,” said Lauren.

Associate Director Caroline came to the Milken Institute with a background in public policy. She is passionate about ensuring that next-generation communities allow people of all ages to thrive.

“I focus on how communities and health systems can prepare for the next decade. In 2030 society will cross several demographic thresholds and issues like long-term care, caregiving and other critical workforce challenges need to be approached with a greater sense of urgency and collective action,” said Caroline.

Together Lauren and Caroline are helping to elevate awareness of aging and develop solutions for our changing society.

Research around the future of aging

The Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging has been working with a number of really exciting research projects, and through them is helping to promote positive changes related to aging in our society. An interview series with their Advisory Board members focused on how Covid-19 impacted aging and shed light on new issues, with particular focus on the health and wellness of aging communities. Resources devoted to understanding the “health span” and not just the life span are becoming essential.

The institute has also looked at access to affordable long-term care solutions for middle-income families, with a focus on integrating technology and homecare to increase quality, relieve caregiver burden, and reduce costs on the healthcare system.

Caroline notes, “Some communities are taking impactful steps to address ageism with forward-thinking cities. They are being proactive to create more intergenerational approaches to communities. It is becoming clear there are benefits of programs built for multiple generations.”

Cities like Washington DC, Los Angeles, and others are starting to plan for communities that thrive together. Some places are offering incentives for older people with spare rooms to rent to younger people. This helps offset housing deficits and other issues through multi-generational housing arrangements.

Overcoming ageism and planning for more united communities

When people experience ageism it can harm health, wealth, and social wellbeing. Ageism also costs our society, from lost productivity to direct health care costs.

Lauren shared, “Tackling ageism in all its forms, including media representation, bias in the health system and workplaces, and interpersonal interactions, is critical both for individuals and for our society as a whole.”

Researchers have found that individuals with positive perceptions of aging live on average 7.5 years longer and people can take action to maximize their own health spans. Simple everyday steps like exercise, healthy eating, and social engagement can have protective effects and reduce risk for many age-related diseases.

Want to learn more about the future of aging and ways you can positively impact your own health and your community?

Join us Thursday, Oct. 28 for the Guest Speaker: The Future of Aging - Challenges and Opportunities to learn how we can reimagine the future of aging.

May 17, 2022
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Liz Miller

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